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Adjustment policies for trade-sensitive industries a research report prepared for the Economic Council of Canada.

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Published by Economic Council of Canada in [Ottawa, Canada] .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Canada.

Subjects:

  • Trade adjustment assistance -- Canada.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. [171]-190.

ContributionsEconomic Council of Canada.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHF1421 .A39 1988
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 194 p. :
Number of Pages194
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2142454M
ISBN 100660127989
LC Control Number88212328

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Oct 01,  · One of the keys to achieving these goals is to include a border adjustment mechanism—a fee on the carbon content of goods imported from countries that do not restrict GHG emissions—in U.S. climate change policies. trade-exposed industries. 2 Other policies, trade-sensitive industries. The bill also requires the president to. As mentioned above, imports from China in the energy-intensive, trade-sensitive industries are very small (14% of cement, 7 % of steel, 3% of aluminum, 4% of paper, and less than 1% of chemicals). These five industries also make up a small portion of the U.S. economy, accounting for 3% of economic output and less than 2% of U.S. employment. Globalization and America’s Trade Agreements. By William Krist. Globalization and America’s Trade Agreements is a valuable guide for newcomers to trade policy and a challenging critique of trade policy for those already knowledgeable. In this book, William Krist reviews the impact of the United States’ complex trade agreements of the past 25 years and examines the issues in recent rounds. Jun 05,  · A. United States. The US labour market has seen significant recovery from the Great Recession—unemployment rates fell from % in November to % in November (more than one percentage point lower than the post-war unemployment average), 36 indicating that the US economy is near full employment. However, this figure does not provide much relief for the many Author: Michael Trebilcock, Sally Wong.

within trade-sensitive industries. • Workers both in trade-sensitive private services and in manufacturing industries faced higher displacement rates than other workers. The likelihood of re-employment, however, was slightly higher for private service workers than for manufacturing workers in trade-sensitive industries. Policy Implications. Sep 10,  · As mentioned above, imports from China in the energy-intensive, trade-sensitive industries are very small (14% of cement, 7 % of steel, 3% of aluminum, 4% of paper, and less than 1% of chemicals). These five industries also make up a small portion of the U.S. economy, accounting for 3% of economic output and less than 2% of U.S. employment. Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more. WORKER ADJUSTMENT IN PERSPECTIVE 3. favorable climate for the consumption of imports and for foreign in vestment, while sales by American manufacturers suffered in both domestic and foreign markets. The macroeconomic policies of the early s were not in and of themselves a fundamental cause of the long-term decline in goods-.

This paper reviews recent developments and issues in trade and trade-related policies of the industrial. industrial countries resorted increasingly to nontariff measures to protect trade-sensitive industries from foreign competition. weak enforcement mechanisms, cumbersome trade negotiations), the inadequate adjustment to changed. The United States foreign trade deficit continues to rank near the top of disturbing economic issues. A number of explanations for the trade imbalance have been proffered, including unfair trade practices abroad, the dollar's high international value, financial problems of some large developing countries, and sluggish growth elsewhere in the industrial world. Norway also reduced direct subsidies to producers from the early s, although support remains high and sector specific. After , subsidy rates declined in Canada and Australia where policies have been reoriented to expedite adjustment in declining industries; in other countries, subsidies to industry were relatively stable or increased. Does the Choice of Intra-Industry Trade Measure Matter? to the West relate more to trade adjustment policies than to price intervention on the world market. in a “trade sensitive Author: Joakim Gullstrand.